Category Results for Proposal Writing

Is OASIS+ for you?

OASIS+ presents a great opportunity for any company, large or small

GSA released the Draft OASIS+ Multi-Agency Contract (MAC) RFP on November 15, and vendors around the beltway and the country are reviewing it to make their bid decisions. What opportunity does OASIS+ present? What are the challenges to getting an award? What should be considered when making the bid decision? OASIS+ upside OASIS+ presents a great opportunity for any company, large or small, to get a foot into government contracting. It represents GSA’s “next generation Best-in-Class Multi-Agency Contracts for complex non-IT services.” With six contract programs (including five for small businesses), OASIS+ covers a broad spectrum of domains—eight for unrestricted (UNR) bidders and seven for small business (SB)—and dozens of NAICS codes. Domains in the initial contract include technical and engineering, management, R&D, environmental, enterprise services (UNR only), logistics, facilities management, and intelligence. Additional domains will be added later. Contractor teaming arrangements (CTAs) may include joint ventures and traditional prime/sub … Continue reading Is OASIS+ for you?

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“Evolve Care Package” for creating a high-scoring proposal – post-RFP release

The race is on now—the U.S. Department of State (DOS) Bureau of Information Resource Management (IRM) released its $10B Evolve IDIQ request for proposal (RFP) on December 2, 2022. Evolve bid milestones December 5, 2022: The portal for questions opens. December 9, 2022 at 2:00 PM ET: The portal for questions closes. December 14, 2022: Vendor training session focused on Symphony registration. January 18, 2023 at 2:00 PM ET: Phase 1 proposals are due. April 2023: Companies are invited to continue to Phase 2 (this date is subject to change). Q4 FY2023: Final awards made on Phase 2 proposals (this is an estimated date). Contract award categories The bid is highly competitive—hundreds of companies showed interest during DOS’ industry day. DOS stated it is awarding 34 Evolve contracts, and offerors can submit proposals for one or more of five functional categories: IT Management Services Functional Category (FC1) (NAICS 541513) Eight … Continue reading “Evolve Care Package” for creating a high-scoring proposal – post-RFP release

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“Evolve Care Package” for creating a high-scoring proposal

The U.S. Department of State (DOS) Bureau of Information Resource Management (IRM) is about to release its $10B Evolve IDIQ. The bid is highly competitive—hundreds of companies showed interest during DOS’ industry day—while DOS is only likely to award 36 Evolve contracts. Evolve stage gates DOS is looking to eliminate low performers early in the competition and has set up two stage gates. In Stage 1, companies must pass DOS’ evaluation of their past performance, corporate experience, and information provided on the “go/no go” information sheets. Companies passing Stage 1 continue to Stage 2, where the competition increases. Companies must make two oral presentations in response to an unknown technical challenge and a management approach. DOS will use the Best Value-Tradeoff source selection process defined in FAR 15.101-1 (Tradeoff Process) to make the award. For non-price factors, DOS will consider the strengths, weaknesses, and deficiencies associated with your bid. DOS … Continue reading “Evolve Care Package” for creating a high-scoring proposal

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Use of personal pronouns in government proposals

Always try to be respectful of the customer

During one of Lohfeld Consulting Group’s recent proposal writing classes, a student asked, “how should we use personal pronouns in government proposals?” I answered that I always tried to be respectful of the customer I was addressing and the person to whom I am referring in the proposal and use their pronouns of choice. However, in many cases you might not know their pronouns of choice, so consider using their title. I wasn’t satisfied with my immediate answer, so I decided to consult the government’s plainlanguage.gov website. Here’s what the website indicated: Avoid using “he” or “she” You can avoid awkwardness by using “you” to address the reader directly, rather than using “he or she” or “his or her.” Make sure you use pronouns that clearly refer to a specific noun. If a pronoun could refer to more than one person or object in a sentence, repeat the name of … Continue reading Use of personal pronouns in government proposals

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