Category Results for Go-to-Market

Before you burst through the $27.5M size standard

Part 4 of 4 in Lohfeld’s MAC series

Government has two definitions of a company’s size: large or small. MACs use North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Codes to classify small business size standards. The size standard may vary depending on which NAICS Code the contracting office applies. One of the most popular size standards is $27.5M of revenue on average for the past 3 years. If you are a successful small business, chances are you are going to burst through the MAC’s size standard mid-way through the contract. Some small businesses have achieved remarkable success, while other companies graduate just above the $27.5M size standard and must overcome resource challenges to enter the mid-tier range. We can learn from their success stories and challenges. ActioNet is now #62 on Washington Technology list of the Top 100 Government Contractors in 2018. By the time ActioNet won Alliant and CIO-SP3 Small Business awards, the company was well positioned to succeed. … Continue reading Before you burst through the $27.5M size standard

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Maximize your competitive edge to win more MAC task orders

Part 3 of 4 in Lohfeld’s MAC series

A small group of awardees on a given MAC will earn the lion’s share of the total value of all MAC awards. For example, the Top 15 MAC incumbents in FY17 earned nearly 21% of all MAC dollars spent. To further underscore this point, the top 10 businesses on Alliant Small Business and CIO-SP3 Small Business earned 50% of all contract dollars in FY17. So how do a select group of companies earn most of the dollars on a given MAC, and what can other companies learn from their success? 1. They understand their customers All the top MAC earners (Leidos, Booz Allen and Hamilton, CSRA, Northrop Grumman, CACI, etc.) have account managers, program managers, or business developers that are dedicated to maintaining good business relations with a specific segment of customers. They understand the customer’s objectives, operations, budgets, constraints, etc. They routinely meet with customers to learn about their … Continue reading Maximize your competitive edge to win more MAC task orders

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How MACs can increase your bottom line

Part 1 of 4 in Lohfeld’s MAC series

What are Multiple-Award Contracts (MAC) and why should they matter to you? Simply put, a MAC is a basic contract awarded to multiple contractors against which they compete for task order awards. MACs are also referred to as Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) and Government Wide Acquisition Contracts (GWAC). Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) govern how government agencies use MACs to procure goods and services. MACs should matter to every government contractor for five reasons. MAC spending represented nearly 25% of all U.S. Government spending in fiscal 2017. During the fourth quarter, which starts July 1, most of that spending occurs through MACs. Government agencies depend on MACs to support their workload due to compressed timelines and limited acquisition resources—especially in the fourth quarter. Many MACs are designated as Best in Class (BICs) contracts, and agencies such as the Department of Defense (DOD) are using BICs as their preferred method to acquire … Continue reading How MACs can increase your bottom line

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Show me the money! (Part 5) Pipeline development: identifying relevant opportunities for pursuit

A Go-to-Market strategy series

Not to beat the same drum too much, but it is important to remember that research is king! As we reviewed in previous posts, conducting in-depth internal research of who you are, what you do, and how you do it is the first crucial step to uncovering the right target markets, positioning you to determine relevant opportunities, and providing the understanding of where you can make an impact. The second crucial step is the external research that determines where you are, where you want to be, and how to get there—what makes the most sense to your fundamental product and service offerings. For example, if you are a marketing services company that has concentrated in the healthcare field, your focus should not stray from that in your initial goals to expand with current customers and attract new customers. Therefore, it makes sense to focus your opportunities search within HHS, VA, … Continue reading Show me the money! (Part 5) Pipeline development: identifying relevant opportunities for pursuit

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