Articles tagged with : Washington Technology

Here’s how to tune up your business for 2016

Washington Technology Article

We have been talking with lots of companies to understand what they are doing to win more business in 2016, and I thought I would share some of what we learned with you. Surprisingly, the results are pretty consistent. Many companies found that winning has gotten harder, especially since the government’s budget has been in a steady decline for the past 7 years. We all fully understand the notion that with fewer dollars to spread across government contractors, companies have to fight harder to win their share. Many companies realize that what they did to win in the good times just isn’t good enough today. To move ahead, companies have to work smarter and harder and reinvent what they are doing to remain competitive. It should come as no surprise that if a company isn’t continually improving how it competes for new business, then it is actually falling behind as...

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The challenging search for good procurement practices

Washington Technology Article

A year ago, headlines were all about IT procurement reform, with Congress threatening to impose new rules on government that promised to increase effectiveness and improve results. This quickly gave way to more sage advice arguing that what we needed was not procurement reform, but instead, continual and incremental improvements in procurement processes and adoption of best procurement practices. Today, I see little evidence that the government procurement market is converging on the best IT procurement practices. Instead, agencies appear to be adopting diverse strategies focusing on finding expedient, protest-resistant procurement solutions rather than focusing on enhancing mission outcomes. Many of these practices are gaining market share, but may fall short of achieving long-term mission objectives and have unintended outcomes that ultimately may prove disadvantageous to both government and industry. Let me give you some examples. GSA GWACS Both OASIS and the upcoming Alliant II large and small business procurements...

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How the winners won SEWP V

Washington Technology Article

If you’ve been following NASA’s $20 billion Solutions Enterprise Wide Procurement (SEWP V), you might be interested in knowing how the bidders won their awards. Like many procurements, this government-wide contract started out as a highly competitive procurement that received over 200 proposals from companies competing to win a coveted award on this 10-year (5-year base plus one 5-year option) IDIQ contract. When awards were first announced, disgruntled bidders filed protests with the Government Accountability Office (GAO), and NASA voluntarily agreed to reevaluate the proposals. After reevaluation, the agency made 202 contract awards, and every bidder who submitted an acceptable proposal was given a contract award. With no bidders left to protest, SEWP V moved forward as the contract of choice for many government organizations. Here are the details of what happened, and you can draw your own conclusions about the surprise ending to the evaluation process. SEWP procurement description...

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20 ways to reduce B&P costs and still win

Washington Technology Article

Many companies have experienced flat or declining sales in the prior year and, consequently, are dealing with reduced bid and proposal (B&P) budgets this year. This begs the question, can proposals be written in a less-costly way without reducing win rates? Obviously, we can reduce proposal costs, but many cost-reduction initiatives cause win rates to plummet. To find out why proposals cost too much, I asked our proposal consulting team to share their insights. Since this team works on the front lines of about 400 proposals per year, I was sure they could offer valuable insight into why costs are too high and what companies can do to reduce proposal costs without lowering win rates. Here are some of the reasons we found that proposal costs are higher than they should be. False starts Some companies fail to review the RFP before starting their proposal. In these instances, they kick...

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