Articles tagged with : proposal writing

“APBs” of persuasive proposal writing for reluctant writers, enigmatic engineers, and circuitous SMEs

Lohfeld Business Winning Webinar

In this webinar, Julia Quigley showed how you can accomplish your proposal writing objectives without the typical anxiety as she demonstrated her APB writing method. This proven process makes writing manageable and produces compliant, easy-to-evaluate text that highlights your company's strengths. Click to register and watch Webinar Replay and download Webinar Slides If you missed Lisa Pafe's recent whitepaper on strengths-based solutioning and what content evaluators are looking for in your proposals, catch up on Win Rates Double with 7 Quality Measures. This white paper gives you a clear picture of the info you need to include in your proposals, and Julia's webinar shows you an anxiety-free method to easily convey that info so government evaluators can't miss it. Click to download 7 Quality Measures Research Report Your presenter:   Julia Quigley has worked on a variety of Federal Health IT task orders and large federal proposals. With a Master’s in...

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Getting a non-producer to deliver? Ask the Proposal Doctor

Dear Proposal Doctor, I have one non-producer on my proposal team. Everyone in the organization has told me that this guy is the absolute right person to craft a 10-page section on a topic that he knows inside out. But, he doesn't deliver. He keeps saying it is in progress, and I will get something soon. Others have told me not to worry. However, as a proposal manager, how can I not worry? This person could make or break the entire proposal. Time is ticking. Please tell me what to do before it is too late. Biting My Fingernails Dear Biting, You are right to be worried! This is an archetypal proposal situation, and one that is particularly common in "expert cultures" where people have more knowledge in their heads than they can ever get onto paper—much less into 10 pages. The good news is that there are ways out...

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100 words that kill your proposals

Inexperienced proposal writers seem to use words that should be avoided when writing proposals. These inappropriate words and phrases can weaken a proposal, annoy evaluators, and even undermine the bidder’s credibility. To help you write better proposals, we have compiled a list of the most frequently used words that should be avoided when writing proposals. Some of these came from Carl Dickson at CapturePlanning.com, while others came from lists that have circulated around the proposal industry for so long that the identity of the original authors has been lost. Our list doesn’t cover every word that should be avoided, and there are certainly exceptions to the usage rules, but our list does provide guidance and suggests alternative words that will strengthen your proposal. (The full list is actually about 200 words.) 100-Words-to-Avoid-in-Proposals-Lohfeld-Consulting-Group (click to download) Here’s a brief discussion of the kinds of words you should avoid. Crutch words When...

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The Proposal Dentist: Extracting a Technical Approach from the Technical Experts

by Brooke Crouter (This article appeared in the Fall 2011 edition of APMP-NCA’s Executive Summary eZine.) As budgets shrink, there will be fewer new contracts in the government market. With fewer deals, firms that compete for federal business will need to write sharper proposals to win their share of work. It is imperative that our proposals tell a clear story that resonates with the buyer. In particular, we must be able to present a fact-based approach that demonstrates a clear, tangible value to the potential customer. To achieve this, we need three critical elements: compliance, reviewability, and approach. Compliance. Compliance is the “entry fee” to the game; we must respond to the RFP criteria completely or risk having our proposal removed from further consideration. Compliance defines the structure of our response and ensures we meet all requirements. We all know we have to focus on compliance, and we rarely miss...

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