Articles tagged with : proposal process

6 ways your proposal can fail – and how to avoid them

I received a call from a mid-sized large business that had submitted a proposal for IT services and had just learned their proposal did not make competitive range. They were irate and wanted to protest, alleging that the government had not fairly evaluated their proposal. They had hired a proposal consultant, spent lots of money developing their proposal, and were assured their proposal was professionally done. Before filing the protest, the company asked me to review their proposal. Here’s what I found when I did the review and what I told them. Professionally developed proposals always have the same characteristics — they are compliant, responsive, compelling, and customer focused. They present a solution that is easy to evaluate and score well — and they are aesthetically attractive. I used each of these criteria while reviewing this company's submission. Compliance The proposal’s structure is expected to follow the request for proposal’s (RFP)...

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Audio Tip: Three Keys to Creating Winning Proposals

What the best proposals have in common

Alternative content This month, capture and proposal development expert and columnist for Washington Technology magazine, Bob Lohfeld, offers three keys for creating winning proposals. Creating winning proposals is not the same as writing a proposal. Anyone can write a proposal for government work, given enough time and resources. However, only one bidder writes the winning proposal. The best proposals have three things in common: They are directed and written by talented people experienced at writing proposals. They follow a similar, defined process. They are designed in an environment that creates proposals efficiently. Your capture and proposal managers bring necessary skills to plan, staff, lead, and control your capture campaign and develop your competitive proposal. The capture manager leads the campaign, and the proposal manager comes in before RFP release to focus on developing the proposal. This team knows that the first step to a winning proposal is developing a winning...

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5 Predictions for the 2020 Market

Will things be better or worse or both?

Capture and proposal management, as a practice and a profession, continually changes. Recently, we asked leading professionals what changes they expect to see by 2020, and I think some of the predictions will surprise you. Here are some humorous as well as common-sense extensions of where we are today and what you might expect to see in coming years. Government market The government push to insource will have disappeared, having been debated and resolved at least once in each of the last three decades. Government and industry will be partners, working together to streamline acquisition processes and reduce wasteful proposal requirements (and time spent on the activity). Government procurement organizations will have been substantially rebuilt. The need for hard-copy proposal submissions will have disappeared or diminished sharply, especially with the push for green computing. I think sophisticated multimedia proposals versus text-heavy submissions will increase companies’ competitive positioning (remember the videotape...

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Using Best Practices to Build Your Production Battle Plan

You can win all of these battles but still lose the war if you do not succeed on the final task—producing and delivering the bid!

Contractors fight many battles during the war to win business with the government, from capture management and solutioning to finding key personnel. You can win all of these battles but still lose the war if you do not succeed on the final task—producing and delivering the bid! Briana Coleman provides sound guidance for developing your own production battle plan, taking you through the BD life cycle and discussing how to incorporate production into each phase. Using war stories from the industry’s leading editors, desktop publishers, graphic artists, and printing companies, she discusses best practices. Briana defines production elements (it’s more than just hitting print), discusses how to budget (time and money) for production and when to start, identifies key skills of the best production staffs, and tells how to begin contingency planning. Review comprehensive production checklists to help you develop your own winning production battle plan for your next bid....

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