Articles tagged with : proposal development

Pressing commitments – how to be “fair” as proposal manager?

Dear Proposal Doctor, I am running a big proposal. Several people on the team are critical to the effort because of how much they know. Each seems to have some kind of personal commitment that cuts into their day several times a week. It’s either kids, medical appointments, other professional commitments, a sick relative, a household repair, or something else. I don’t want to have one standard for most of the team (you need to be in the office) and another standard for a select minority (you can set your own schedule because I can’t live without you). I am at a loss as to how to manage this and still maintain the morale of the team. Please help. -Trying To Be Fair Dear Trying, You are correct. It is very difficult to have two standards and maintain your integrity as a leader. So, I would suggest just one standard,...

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Improving Win Rates – Strategies and Tactics to Raise Your Success

Did you know your company can raise its win probability by 20% on each and every bid that it submits by following 7 proven steps? Imagine how much additional revenue your firm could generate if you could increase your win rate by 20% -- and imagine how much you could grow your business with the additional profit. Increasing win rates is everybody’s goal, yet few people address the task of raising overall company win rates. In this webinar, capture and proposal expert Bob Lohfeld shares Lohfeld Consulting Group's research on how to increase proposal win rates and explains the 7 factors that affect overall company win rates. Each viewer can use the 7-factor model to assess their company’s performance in key areas that affect win rates and build a preliminary plan for win rate improvement. The 7 steps to raise your win probability will make you better prepared to compete...

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The Proposal Dentist: Extracting a Technical Approach from the Technical Experts

by Brooke Crouter (This article appeared in the Fall 2011 edition of APMP-NCA’s Executive Summary eZine.) As budgets shrink, there will be fewer new contracts in the government market. With fewer deals, firms that compete for federal business will need to write sharper proposals to win their share of work. It is imperative that our proposals tell a clear story that resonates with the buyer. In particular, we must be able to present a fact-based approach that demonstrates a clear, tangible value to the potential customer. To achieve this, we need three critical elements: compliance, reviewability, and approach. Compliance. Compliance is the “entry fee” to the game; we must respond to the RFP criteria completely or risk having our proposal removed from further consideration. Compliance defines the structure of our response and ensures we meet all requirements. We all know we have to focus on compliance, and we rarely miss...

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How bad are your proposals?

Only 15% of companies said their proposals were always compliant, responsive, and compelling

In last month’s column, 6 ways your proposal can fail, I wrote about a company that submitted a less-than-professional proposal and wondered how pervasive this problem really is. After all, as professional proposal managers, how bad can our proposals really be? All professional proposal managers strive to make every proposal compliant, responsive, and compelling, yet a recent presentation reinforced my assessment that only about 15% of the firms bidding on U.S. government contracts consistently achieve these fundamental objectives. In a GovCon Business Development Weekly webinar hosted by Deltek’s Michael Hackmer, I discussed four fundamentals for creating a winning proposal. The first three fundamentals comprise creating a compliant, responsive, and compelling proposal. We polled the 150 webinar participants from a cross-section of small to large government contractors and asked them to rate how well their proposals did in achieving those three objectives. What we learned was surprising. Only 15% said their...

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