Articles tagged with : proposal development

7 tips for crafting a dominant proposal summary

Focus on the customer, be feature rich, and help evaluators maximize your score

Not all requests for proposals (RFP) call for an Executive Summary, and when proposals must have limited pages, it might be best to skip an Executive Summary. But for large proposals or RFPs that ask for an Executive Summary, here are seven steps to creating an effective one. 1. Decide when to write. I’m in the camp that believes later is better. An Executive Summary is a summary of your proposal, and if you haven’t written the proposal, it is hard to write an effective summary. If you decide to write your Executive Summary early to give guidance to your proposal team about your approach and major strengths, plan to write twice. 2. Stay focused. An effective Executive Summary provides an overview of your proposal and highlights the features that will be scored as strengths in the evaluation. Clearly tie the features of your approach to the benefits the client...

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Pitfalls to avoid in a down market

Avoid chasing too many opportunities and rushing headlong into new markets.

With all the talk about budget cuts, we see some companies overreacting and altering their bidding strategies. Budget reduction numbers out of Congress indicate that 2011 spending will decline by $38 billion. According to Ray Bjorklund, senior vice president and chief knowledge officer at FedSources, the challenge is determining how many of those dollars are attached to contracts. “There’s spending, and there’s contract spending,” Bjorklund said. “A significant amount of the $38 billion is in government compensation loan programs, and subsidies and therefore not contractor-addressable.” The net authority that agencies have to spend on compensation and contracts — but not loans, grants or subsidies — in fiscal 2011 is $1.8 trillion, and it is this amount that was hit by the $38 billion in cuts. Although $38 billion is a large amount, it represents only 2 percent of the total spending authority. Meanwhile, reactive, quick-fix strategy changes can often be...

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3 Critical Steps to Surviving Tough Times

People, training, and technology are critical.

There's little doubt that the federal budget will undergo some contractions this year, either because Congress will reduce spending levels outright for some agencies or the inevitable flow of continuing resolutions will postpone approval for new spending levels. As budgets shrink, there will be fewer new contracts in the government contractor market. With fewer deals to compete for, contractors will need to raise their level of competitiveness to win their share. Now is the time to invest in new business acquisition, not scale back. Companies making investments in people, processes and technology will raise their level of competitiveness and, in the face of a tightening market, will win their share of new business. Companies failing to meet these new challenges will become casualties as they watch the market change and competitions become more demanding. Invest in people You can raise the level of competitiveness of your business development (BD), capture...

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