Articles tagged with : proposal best practice

NEW Lohfeld book released – 10 steps to creating high-scoring proposals: A modern perspective on proposal development and what really matters

We’re excited to introduce our latest book to you—10 steps to creating high-scoring proposals: A modern perspective on proposal development and what really matters—now available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats. Here’s an overview of our new book. (You can find out more about our other five books here.) Introduction Beth Wingate, President Bob Lohfeld developed the 10 steps to creating high-scoring proposals presentation that he and I expanded into this book to share our modern perspective on proposal management and what matters within the proposal process with our customers. We’re using these 10 steps to help our customers concentrate on what’s really important in proposal development and on best practices that may have fallen to the wayside because of different priorities within their organizations. In this book, Bob will walk you through the source selection decision-making process and what the government evaluators and the final decision maker look...

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Is it always necessary to create graphics first? Ask the Proposal Doctor

Dear Proposal Doctor, My capture manager is insisting that we complete a big stack of graphics before we write any proposal text. We have a decent amount of time for this proposal, more than we usually get. But, my writers are worried about how long the graphics process will take and the compressed writing schedule that will surely follow. Is it always necessary to create graphics first? Where did this rule come from? How can I make it work with a team that does not really think visually? I understand the capture manager's point of view, but I also see where the writers are coming from. Please help. -Stuck in the Middle Dear Stuck, I am so glad you asked this question because it goes to a tension at the heart of our profession. Everyone wants the universal rule or the “best practice” (not my favorite term) that applies to...

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100 words that kill your proposals

Inexperienced proposal writers seem to use words that should be avoided when writing proposals. These inappropriate words and phrases can weaken a proposal, annoy evaluators, and even undermine the bidder’s credibility. To help you write better proposals, we have compiled a list of the most frequently used words that should be avoided when writing proposals. Some of these came from Carl Dickson at CapturePlanning.com, while others came from lists that have circulated around the proposal industry for so long that the identity of the original authors has been lost. Our list doesn’t cover every word that should be avoided, and there are certainly exceptions to the usage rules, but our list does provide guidance and suggests alternative words that will strengthen your proposal. (The full list is actually about 200 words.) 100-Words-to-Avoid-in-Proposals-Lohfeld-Consulting-Group (click to download) Here’s a brief discussion of the kinds of words you should avoid. Crutch words When...

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Color Team Reviews—Purposes and Goals

How to run effective color team reviews - and what to review to ensure a compliant, compelling proposal response.

Alternative content This week, proposal development expert Beth Wingate, APMP Fellow, offers a quick rundown of what to review for in the various color team reviews and offers tips for running effective reviews. Color reviews help to ensure a compliant, compelling proposal response. Your Chief Reviewer should select a team from within your organization (include teammates, if applicable) that can effectively review the proposal—standing in the shoes of government evaluators and adding value and detail. I recommend four basic color reviews for each non-pricing volume. Blue-Reviews and approves final solution, strategy, and storyboards or richly annotated outlines. Reviews for features, benefits, differentiators, strengths, supporting evidence, and themes. Reviews overall proposal solution graphic and major section graphics.Tip: Only after reviewing/approving all of this material and freezing the solution/offering should you release writers to write. Pink–Reviews for compliance with RFP instructions and requirements; responsive proposal content that tells a coherent story, supports...

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