Articles tagged with : government proposal

To Bid or Not to Bid

Seven Criteria for Making Sound Bid Decisions and Avoiding the Traps that Lead to Poor Bid Decisions

The bid/no-bid decision is the most important decision you can make in the bidding process. Making it correctly can raise your win rate, increase your company's revenue growth rate, and reduce your overall cost of new business acquisition. Making it poorly can cost you, your proposal team, and maybe your company. Bob Lohfeld discusses the Seven Criteria for Making Good Bid Decisions and the Traps that Cause Executives to Make Poor Decisions. He also discusses how balanced score cards can be used to predict win probability and how portfolio management techniques can be used to select bid opportunities.

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5 Passing Grades You Need to Lead the Pack

Preview solutions with government stakeholders to validate assumptions and build advocacy for your offering.

Ever wonder why some companies appear to be the odds-on favorite to win a contract? A well-orchestrated, pre-request for proposals ritual goes on long before a procurement is released for bid. Company business development, technical and management professionals step up the frequency of visits to their customers to better understand customer objectives and to perfect their company’s solution. Those professionals also preview their solutions with government stakeholders to validate assumptions and build advocacy for their company’s offering. Their focus is simple: ensuring their proposed solution meets or exceeds government requirements and resonates with the customer. Those industry professionals work to shape the agency’s procurement strategy, ensuring it is favorable to their firm and the solutions they will propose. Offering insights on procurement strategy; choice of contract vehicles; RFP instructions, evaluation factors, subfactors, and criteria; contract terms and conditions; and pricing approaches are the norm. Discussion topics in some procurements, such...

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Ask the Right Questions to Understand Customer Objectives

How well do you understand your customer's requirements and objectives?

Did you know the leading indicator for predicting whether you will be successful in a government bid is how well you understand the customer’s requirements and objectives? As a capture team leader, one of your first jobs is to understand and document your customer’s requirements and objectives. Requirements are the activities a company must do when it performs the contract. They include technical and management tasks described in the scope of work, generally found in Section C of a federal government request for proposals. But they can also reside in other sections and attachments to the RFP. On the other hand, objectives are more elusive. They are the desired outcomes that the government hopes to achieve by having a company perform the contract requirements in an exceptional manner. Every bidder will offer to perform the contract requirements, but the successful bidder will show how its approach ensures the government’s objectives...

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What the Government Won’t Tell You About Your Proposal

When you talk, be prepared and know what is left unsaid.

Congratulations, your proposal has made competitive range, and the government has contacted you to discuss your offer. What the government will and won’t tell you in these discussions can be a surprise to the unprepared bidder, but sophisticated players know the rules and what to expect. First, it is important to know if your dialogue with the government is a discussion or a clarification. There is a difference, and it is important to which type of communication is being requested. Discussions are a formal part of the federal procurement process that allows the government to engage in a substantive dialogue with offerors. They occur after the competitive range determination. If you engage in discussions, a meaningful two-way exchange of information, then you are entitled to revise any part of your proposal you desire — unless, of course, the government tells you otherwise. If you engage in clarifications, responding to requests...

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