Articles tagged with : federal procurement

GSA Alliant 2: Focus now on Product Service Codes (PSCs)

GSA Alliant 2 and Alliant 2 SB will be released on or about June 20 with a 60-day turn. GSA announced via GSA Interact that vendors should be cautious about relying on the draft since the final RFP will contain major changes. However, there is one area you can work hard right now: Product Service Codes (PSCs). Pesky PSCs encompass 40 percent of the available evaluation points. Bidders must prove that they have up to seven distinct projects across three PSC groups to gain maximum points. How do bidders prove the PSC code? The draft RFP requires that bidders submit the most recent Federal Procurement Data System-Next Generation (FPDS-NG) report identifying the PSC code. Your first step is to search on FPDS-NG for the relevant experience projects you plan to use in your proposal. What should you do if the PSC code you want to claim is not reflected in...

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Do’s and don’ts of lowering your proposal costs

I used to think that no one would have the audacity to say you’re spending too much on proposals as long as you were winning. With companies falling short of revenue goals, however, most certainly there will be downward pressure on all operating costs, including proposals costs. There are easily 50 ways to reduce proposal costs, but regrettably 45 of these will also lower your win rate. The challenge is to reduce proposal costs without reducing your win rate. We have done a lot of work on win rates and ways to reduce proposal costs. Here are some ideas that work and some that don’t. Compensation levels for proposal professionals With few exceptions, reducing proposal costs is all about reducing the total amount of labor needed to create a winning proposal, not reducing the hourly rate paid to the workforce. In the proposal field, you pretty much get what you pay...

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How to avoid a contract protest

Are protests destined to become just one more milestone in the federal procurement process?

Are protests destined to become just one more milestone in the federal procurement process? Recent evidence might suggest so. Notably, the protested award to Lockheed Martin for the U.S. Antarctic Research program in the South Pole and the Hawker Beechcraft protest of the award of the new light attack aircraft trainer are recent examples. In addition, market experts predict that as defense budgets decline, companies fighting over fewer dollars will launch more protests when losing procurements that can lock them out of programs or agencies for a decade. If protests are to become the norm for competing in major programs, then it’s to everyone’s advantage to find ways to reduce the number of protests and awards that are overturned. When companies file protests, everyone loses. The procuring agency loses because procurement time lines get stretched out. Bidders lose because the cost of participating in federal procurements goes up. Even the...

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