Articles tagged with : evaluation process

How the winners won SEWP V

Washington Technology Article

If you’ve been following NASA’s $20 billion Solutions Enterprise Wide Procurement (SEWP V), you might be interested in knowing how the bidders won their awards. Like many procurements, this government-wide contract started out as a highly competitive procurement that received over 200 proposals from companies competing to win a coveted award on this 10-year (5-year base plus one 5-year option) IDIQ contract. When awards were first announced, disgruntled bidders filed protests with the Government Accountability Office (GAO), and NASA voluntarily agreed to reevaluate the proposals. After reevaluation, the agency made 202 contract awards, and every bidder who submitted an acceptable proposal was given a contract award. With no bidders left to protest, SEWP V moved forward as the contract of choice for many government organizations. Here are the details of what happened, and you can draw your own conclusions about the surprise ending to the evaluation process. SEWP procurement description...

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Is the government starting to hate LPTA too?

I was surprised (and relieved) to learn that government proposal evaluators are pushing back on the use of lowest price, technically acceptable (LPTA) evaluation criteria—and for good reason. They are now learning that this evaluation criteria can limit their ability to exercise reasonable judgment in the evaluation process and may result in contracts awarded to companies that are clearly inferior and have less-qualified offerings compared to others in the competition. Here are two instances where the use of LPTA evaluation criteria backfired on the government decision-makers. Superior value versus price Best-value solicitations frequently state that as technical scores converge and there is little technical difference between bidders, price will become the determining factor in an award decision. Conversely, when price converges and there is little price difference between bidders, the award decision would rationally be made based on the merits of the offeror’s non-cost factors (technical approach, offeror experience, management...

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