Articles tagged with : competitive range

NEW Lohfeld book released – 10 steps to creating high-scoring proposals: A modern perspective on proposal development and what really matters

We’re excited to introduce our latest book to you—10 steps to creating high-scoring proposals: A modern perspective on proposal development and what really matters—now available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats. Here’s an overview of our new book. (You can find out more about our other five books here.) Introduction Beth Wingate, President Bob Lohfeld developed the 10 steps to creating high-scoring proposals presentation that he and I expanded into this book to share our modern perspective on proposal management and what matters within the proposal process with our customers. We’re using these 10 steps to help our customers concentrate on what’s really important in proposal development and on best practices that may have fallen to the wayside because of different priorities within their organizations. In this book, Bob will walk you through the source selection decision-making process and what the government evaluators and the final decision maker look...

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What the Government Won’t Tell You About Your Proposal

When you talk, be prepared and know what is left unsaid.

Congratulations, your proposal has made competitive range, and the government has contacted you to discuss your offer. What the government will and won’t tell you in these discussions can be a surprise to the unprepared bidder, but sophisticated players know the rules and what to expect. First, it is important to know if your dialogue with the government is a discussion or a clarification. There is a difference, and it is important to which type of communication is being requested. Discussions are a formal part of the federal procurement process that allows the government to engage in a substantive dialogue with offerors. They occur after the competitive range determination. If you engage in discussions, a meaningful two-way exchange of information, then you are entitled to revise any part of your proposal you desire — unless, of course, the government tells you otherwise. If you engage in clarifications, responding to requests...

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