Articles tagged with : Bob Lohfeld

2014 realities force companies to change tactics

Sticking to the old ways may spell your demise

This article was originally published September 20, 2013 in WashingtonTechnology.com. By Bob Lohfeld There is no doubt that going into fiscal 2014, the market will be different. Sequestration and continuing resolutions will take their toll on the federal budget, resulting in fewer procurements. The net result is that competition for the remaining government dollars will be stiffer as companies battle for market share. Companies that don’t change their tactics to compete in the new budget-constrained government market will give way to others who are adapting to these new challenges. As part of our webinar series on Winning Business in the Government Market, we polled over 300 companies to see what they were doing to raise their competitiveness in the coming year and found some interesting results. Here’s what we learned. How good is your capture process? The centerpiece of a company’s business acquisition campaign is its capture management process. As...

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Bold trends in capture and proposal management – Lohfeld BD Webinar Series – Sept. 2013

In an increasingly competitive global market, top-tier companies are adapting and executing new practices to increase their win probabilities. Bob Lohfeld presents some of the more interesting trends in capture and proposal management and discusses how these are changing the competitive landscape for these firms. [flowplayer id="3289"]   Click to download presentation slides About the presenter: Bob Lohfeld is the founder of Lohfeld Consulting Group, a leading Capture and Proposal Consulting firm specializing in winning government contracts. He is consistently recognized for leadership in business development, capture management, and creating winning proposals and he writes the Capture Management column in Washington Technology magazine. He is a three-time winner of Federal Computer Week's Federal 100 Award.    

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Is the government starting to hate LPTA too?

I was surprised (and relieved) to learn that government proposal evaluators are pushing back on the use of lowest price, technically acceptable (LPTA) evaluation criteria—and for good reason. They are now learning that this evaluation criteria can limit their ability to exercise reasonable judgment in the evaluation process and may result in contracts awarded to companies that are clearly inferior and have less-qualified offerings compared to others in the competition. Here are two instances where the use of LPTA evaluation criteria backfired on the government decision-makers. Superior value versus price Best-value solicitations frequently state that as technical scores converge and there is little technical difference between bidders, price will become the determining factor in an award decision. Conversely, when price converges and there is little price difference between bidders, the award decision would rationally be made based on the merits of the offeror’s non-cost factors (technical approach, offeror experience, management...

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Can you afford to chase premium price? Maybe.

Analysis shows the risk is worth the reward

When the government awards a contract to other than the lowest priced offeror, it pays a price premium to make that award. How much price premium the government will pay is left to the judgment of the selecting official. This amount varies by type of service or product being procured, details of each solicitation, and experience of the source selection official. In 1999, the price premium in a GAO study averaged about 7%. In 2010, the price premium in another GAO study averaged about 5%. Today, in the middle of the sequestration battle, the price premium is probably less than that; however, it’s difficult to generalize because the price premium can be unique to individual procurements. Here’s what we learned from the GAO studies and how you can apply this to your capture strategy. GAO studies In October 2010, GAO published a report, Enhanced Training Could Strengthen DOD’s Best Value...

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