Articles tagged with : best practice

Audio Tip: How to review a Federal Government RFP

Tips for reviewing draft and final RFPs

Alternative content Proposal development expert Beth Wingate, APMP Fellow, offers tips for reviewing Federal Government RFPs (solicitations). Reviewing a Federal Government solicitation combines both a strict process and creativity. Draft RFP When I’m lucky enough to receive a draft RFP, I follow a standard process—reading the solicitation, evaluating the requirements, creating my outline and requirements/compliance matrix, creating checklists, and then preparing briefing charts for my bid/no bid review. Even if the RFP doesn’t follow the Uniform Contract Code (organized by Sections A–M), I still go through the following process. Review the RFP by starting with Section L (Instructions), then M (Evaluation Criteria), then C (Statement of Work (SOW)), H (Special Contract Requirements), I (Contract Clauses), J (Attachments – sometimes where they hide the SOW), and then the rest of the RFP. Look for inconsistencies or places where the government has been unclear. Look for requirements that appear in the wrong...

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4 Fundamentals for creating a winning proposal – GovCon Business Development Weekly with Bob Lohfeld

Deal yourself a winning hand when you write your next proposal

Process carries the day," notes Lohfeld Consulting Group CEO Bob Lohfeld during his 4 Fundamentals for Creating a Winning Proposal webinar, part of the GovWin Business Development Weekly Series. 4 Fundamentals for Creating a Winning Proposal (click for presentation) Audience Q&A from presentation (click for Q&A)  

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6 ways your proposal can fail – and how to avoid them

I received a call from a mid-sized large business that had submitted a proposal for IT services and had just learned their proposal did not make competitive range. They were irate and wanted to protest, alleging that the government had not fairly evaluated their proposal. They had hired a proposal consultant, spent lots of money developing their proposal, and were assured their proposal was professionally done. Before filing the protest, the company asked me to review their proposal. Here’s what I found when I did the review and what I told them. Professionally developed proposals always have the same characteristics — they are compliant, responsive, compelling, and customer focused. They present a solution that is easy to evaluate and score well — and they are aesthetically attractive. I used each of these criteria while reviewing this company's submission. Compliance The proposal’s structure is expected to follow the request for proposal’s (RFP)...

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7 tips for crafting a dominant proposal summary

Focus on the customer, be feature rich, and help evaluators maximize your score

Not all requests for proposals (RFP) call for an Executive Summary, and when proposals must have limited pages, it might be best to skip an Executive Summary. But for large proposals or RFPs that ask for an Executive Summary, here are seven steps to creating an effective one. 1. Decide when to write. I’m in the camp that believes later is better. An Executive Summary is a summary of your proposal, and if you haven’t written the proposal, it is hard to write an effective summary. If you decide to write your Executive Summary early to give guidance to your proposal team about your approach and major strengths, plan to write twice. 2. Stay focused. An effective Executive Summary provides an overview of your proposal and highlights the features that will be scored as strengths in the evaluation. Clearly tie the features of your approach to the benefits the client...

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