Articles tagged with : article

Resolve to Improve Your Win Rate

Focus on capture management and associated activities from the decision to pursue through award.

Let it be resolved that this will be the year in which we raise our new business win rate, write better proposals that cost us less to create, and leave the practice of working to exhaustion on late-night proposals as our final fond memory from the year now past. This New Year’s resolution will probably be made by executives at half the companies that work in the highly competitive government technology market. Yet few companies will change how they pursue new business, prepare for proposals, or handle the demanding task of writing proposals when the request for proposals arrives. To help achieve this New Year’s resolution, let’s focus on capture management and what companies should do from the time they decide to pursue a new opportunity until the award is made. Along with examining the capture management process, we will explore each of its activities. Capture management is a defined,...

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Survival guide | You lost. Now what?

Two industry veterans share what companies should try to learn at the debriefing after losing a contract bid.

Interview with Bob Lohfeld and Steve Carrier Our experts are Steve Carrier, former vice president of business development and strategic planning at Northrop Grumman Information Technology, and Bob Lohfeld, president of Lohfeld Consulting Group and former vice president at Lockheed Martin Information Technology and senior vice president of OAO Corp. CARRIER: Find out as much about the pricing information as they will give you. It is very important to know where you were compared to the winner on price. Next, how did your technical solution stack up against the competitors? Finally, what are the three or four things that caused you to not be selected? Get as many specifics as possible. Also, after the protest period is over and you are not protesting  go back to the customer and potential members of the source selection board and try to find out the real reason you lost. After the protest period...

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Contracting 101: Start with Patience and Value

There are no real shortcuts to becoming a government contractor.

By Joyce Bosc Small businesses with big aspirations often look to government for sales opportunities, but the size of that government-sales undertaking can be overwhelming. Yes, smaller jobs may be sold to government through a simple purchase order, but true success in getting government business takes more. To become established as a trusted government contractor, your company must be prepared for a resource-intensive process that might take as long as two years. The commitment is big, but the successes can be even bigger. There are no real shortcuts to becoming a government contractor. However, an understanding of available government support services and tools can make navigating the process simpler and more efficient. An emerging type of service provider for aspiring contractors is the business development consultant. Often retired from government or from established contracting firms, many consultants offer proposal writing, training and capture management planning to anticipate government sales needs...

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