News & Knowledge Center

10 Reasons Why You Need Capture Management

A successful strategy requires buy-in from corporate leaders and a documented process.

When we examine why companies win or lose new business in the government market, the reasons are amazingly similar. Companies win more often when they focus on understanding customer requirements and objectives. They predictably lose more often when they don’t. Similarly, qualifying new business opportunities early in the business development life cycle results in better win rates, while late qualification results in fewer wins and cost increases in business development. These and other activities are strong indicators of how well a company will do in competitive procurements. This correlation provides clear evidence that companies can raise their win probabilities by performing certain activities well and in the right sequence, thereby establishing the basis for an efficient process known as capture management. Each company implements its capture management process to fit its culture and management structure, and all implementations should include the same fundamental activities. Qualify the opportunity. Assess the new...

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Capture Management Requires Planning

This Q&A with Bob Lohfeld was originally published in Washington Technology magazine August 7, 2008. by David Hubler Q: What is capture management? Lohfeld: Capture management is everything a company does to raise its win probability between the time it decides to pursue an expected government contract and the time the RFP is released. Q: How does it work? Lohfeld: After identifying an opportunity before the RFP is released, the company performs an early stage qualification review to make sure the deal fits the company and that there is a reasonable chance of winning. A capture team is then created from the line operation or from a standing group of capture executives. These are people who know how to orchestrate activities in the marketplace and in the company. They become the champions for the pursuit of the activity, bringing in technical experts, business development experts and consultants as needed. Together...

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3 Keys to Creating Winning Proposals

A defined and efficient process is essential to success.

Creating winning proposals is not the same as writing a proposal. Anyone can write a proposal for government work, given enough time and resources. However, only one bidder writes the winning proposal. The best proposals have three things in common: They are directed and written by talented people experienced at writing proposals. They follow a similar, defined process. They are designed in an environment that creates proposals efficiently. Your capture and proposal managers bring necessary skills to plan, staff, lead and control your capture campaign and develop your competitive proposal. They work as a team and understand each member's role. The capture manager leads the campaign, and the proposal manager comes in before a request for proposals is released to focus on developing the proposal. This team knows that the first step is developing a winning solution. During the capture phase and preproposal phases they work together to: Create a...

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What the Government Won’t Tell You About Your Proposal

When you talk, be prepared and know what is left unsaid.

Congratulations, your proposal has made competitive range, and the government has contacted you to discuss your offer. What the government will and won’t tell you in these discussions can be a surprise to the unprepared bidder, but sophisticated players know the rules and what to expect. First, it is important to know if your dialogue with the government is a discussion or a clarification. There is a difference, and it is important to which type of communication is being requested. Discussions are a formal part of the federal procurement process that allows the government to engage in a substantive dialogue with offerors. They occur after the competitive range determination. If you engage in discussions, a meaningful two-way exchange of information, then you are entitled to revise any part of your proposal you desire — unless, of course, the government tells you otherwise. If you engage in clarifications, responding to requests...

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