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Is it always necessary to create graphics first? Ask the Proposal Doctor

Dear Proposal Doctor, My capture manager is insisting that we complete a big stack of graphics before we write any proposal text. We have a decent amount of time for this proposal, more than we usually get. But, my writers are worried about how long the graphics process will take and the compressed writing schedule that will surely follow. Is it always necessary to create graphics first? Where did this rule come from? How can I make it work with a team that does not really think visually? I understand the capture manager's point of view, but I also see where the writers are coming from. Please help. -Stuck in the Middle Dear Stuck, I am so glad you asked this question because it goes to a tension at the heart of our profession. Everyone wants the universal rule or the “best practice” (not my favorite term) that applies to...

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Why some companies embrace LPTA contracts

Lower barrier to entry means marginally credible firms have shot at winning procurements

Some companies are actively seeking lowest price, technically acceptable (LPTA) professional services bids—but they’re not the companies you’d think. You’d expect companies with deep experience in their fields that have honed their operating costs to the minimum and are operating at maximum efficiency to seek out LPTA bids where they could compete on price—but it is just the opposite. Inexperienced, marginally credible firms are finding LPTA procurements provide a unique opportunity to penetrate government market segments that they would otherwise have been unable to enter. Here’s how it works. LPTA lower the barrier to entry Under LPTA bids, the government awards contracts to offerors with minimally acceptable technical proposals rather than to offers with the best technical proposals as is normally done in best value trade-off procurements. In other words, the LPTA evaluation criteria provide no additional value to the market leader company over the market laggard company. To pass...

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