TArticles tagged with: proposal management

5 tips for improving your business pipeline and bottom line

Highly profitable businesses are agile. They devote time to researching new bids and pruning their pipeline to maximize their win rate. Their bid staff keep a challenging workload, yet they have enough time to focus on each bid. Does this sound like a wishful thinking? It doesn’t have to be. Here are five tips that can help re-energize your businesses pipeline and increase your win rate. 1. Devote time to creating a realistic 3-year pipeline Create a realistic 3-year pipeline as a baseline. Expedite your search for potential bids by investing in commercial databases, go-to-market services, and competitive analyses. Weight the pipeline with conservative bids. Allocate a smaller part of the pipeline to more aggressive bids that either need heavy bid and proposal (B&P) investment, minimize your profit potential, or focus on new customers or new lines of business. 2. Implement a status dashboard and an integrated master schedule (IMS) … Continue reading 5 tips for improving your business pipeline and bottom line

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Are personalities ruling your color team reviews?

There are anywhere from four to 16 different personality types depending on your Google search results. In the context of proposal color team reviews, proposal managers and review team leads have probably encountered quite a medley of non-constructive participants who seem to do everything in their power to impede progress. Adding to this problem is the increase in virtual review meetings. When reviewers are not physically present, they often exhibit different (ruder) personality types than they would in person. Here are six personality types that I’ve witnessed and six tips for how to deal with them. 1. The Dominator This reviewer takes over the meeting; straying off the planned agenda and timeline; voicing their opinions and recommendations first, foremost, loudest; and often interrupting others. They may even stray off topic, going off on tangents that serve no purpose. If the Dominator is the proposal manager’s direct or indirect boss, it … Continue reading Are personalities ruling your color team reviews?

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Can proposal managers and contracting officers find common ground?

Do proposal managers and contracting officers (COs) have anything in common? Most likely, what we have in common is that we are on each other’s list of pet peeves. Or, one could argue, proposal managers think about the CO much more often than the CO thinks about us! As in, “When will the CO answer the questions? Will the CO extend the due date?” In addition, very rarely, if ever, are proposal managers and COs in the same room. Usually, the capture manager, program manager, and/or business development (BD) professional handles one-on-one meetings with the CO, so proposal managers and COs rarely if ever come face to face. If we ever meet, it is usually in a public setting such as an industry day. Last month, I had the opportunity to participate in a National Contract Management Association (NCMA) Government Contract Management Symposium (GCMS) breakout session—Talking to the Other Side: … Continue reading Can proposal managers and contracting officers find common ground?

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Talking to the other side: proposal managers and contracting officers

Government Contract Management Symposium | Dec. 4, 2017

Dec. 4, 2017, 1:30 pm–2:45 pm Wendy Frieman, Vice President, The Lewin Group Lisa Pafe, Vice President, Lohfeld Consulting Group This panel discussion between contracting officers and proposal managers will explore the ways in which the two communities approach the acquisition process from different perspectives, and often, in the process, miscommunicate and create misconceptions. The discussion among seasoned professionals will be organized around topics that are of most concern to each side, with the goal of surfacing underlying causes as well as possible remedies. ACTIVITY: This is a moderated panel discussion with specific questions posed to the audience, followed by questions from the audience. The value of the session will be enhanced by participation from the audience. Click to learn more about GCMS 2017

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