TArticles tagged with: low price technically acceptable

Working with project managers on recompetes: Risk aversion versus price (Part 1)

This week, Lisa Pafe provides insights into how incumbents should work with their project managers when preparing for recompete procurements. Incumbents often proceed with the re-compete capture and proposal process with only peripheral involvement from the project manager. I believe that this attitude is part of the general problem of incumbentitis – the false sense of security, complacency, and over-confidence that results in failing to take the capture/proposal process seriously and thus losing the recompete bid. In fact, recent industry statistics indicate that incumbents do lose approximately 50% their recompetes. In the current climate of budget constraints, the customer experiences even greater tension between their natural risk aversion and the real or perceived need for fresh perspectives. They must balance low risk versus low price. Only by working closely with the project manager in the capture stage can the capture manager gain an honest assessment of the customer relationship in … Continue reading Working with project managers on recompetes: Risk aversion versus price (Part 1)

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21 Experts’ predictions for capture/proposal industry changes – Part 3

Bundled contracts, unbundled contracts, emphasis on well-trained procurement support staff, training axed in cost-cutting measures, short turnarounds, extended and extended extensions, virtual proposals, everyone in the war room… The more things change… Play this government capture and proposal game long enough, and you start recognizing and anticipating the changing patterns. Talk to those who’ve been in the business for years, and you’ll gain insights into how to deal with a particular round of changes based on what the veterans experienced the last go round. I recently asked a number of my colleagues, “What changes do you anticipate in the next 5 years for the capture/proposal industry, e.g., technology and tools, types of proposals, customers, training, lead time to prepare responses, pricing, etc.?” Here is the final set of their responses. How will you and your company start positioning yourselves to address these projected changes? I expect more bundled contracts with … Continue reading 21 Experts’ predictions for capture/proposal industry changes – Part 3

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21 Experts’ predictions for capture/proposal industry changes – Part 2

The old adage says, “Nothing’s constant except change.” (We can add death and taxes, but even the taxes part seems in constant flux these days!) Stay in the government capture and proposal game long enough, and you’ll start recognizing patterns in the changes. Over the years, you’ll add strategies to your bag of tricks that you’ll be able to whip out to deal with round x of a particular procurement “flavor of the year.” Throughout all of these fluctuations and transformations, though, one thing does remains constant. Business development (BD), capture, and proposal professionals have strong opinions about and desires for changes that would add sanity and structure to the entire procurement process and cut down on the “guess work.” I recently asked a number of my colleagues, “What changes do you anticipate in the next 5 years for the capture/proposal industry, e.g., technology and tools, types of proposals, customers, … Continue reading 21 Experts’ predictions for capture/proposal industry changes – Part 2

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21 Experts’ predictions for capture/proposal industry changes – Part 1

It’s a fact of life that government contracting experiences cyclical changes. Hang around in this game long enough, and you’ll start to recognize “patterns.” Over the last 25 plus years, I’ve seen government contracting shops experience cycles of expansion and contraction, staffed by well-trained professionals and maddeningly inexperienced folks. I’ve seen emphasis on best value turn to low price technically acceptable (LPTA). Contracting groups force fitting every procurement they could into performance-based contracts – many of which had no business even being mentioned in the same breath as “performance-based.” Increases and decreases in the number of bid protests and changes in the government offices charged with adjudicating those protests. Throughout all of these fluctuations and transformations, one thing remains constant. Business development (BD), capture, and proposal professionals have strong opinions about and desires for changes that would add sanity and structure to the entire procurement process and cut down on … Continue reading 21 Experts’ predictions for capture/proposal industry changes – Part 1

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