TArticles tagged with: lessons learned

Top 10 free government websites and databases for supporting your bid

The Federal Government publishes an inordinate amount of free information for jumpstarting your bids.

The Federal Government publishes an inordinate amount of free information for jumpstarting your bids. We summarize our top 10 favorites below. Many of these free databases are hosted by the General Services Administration (GSA), so visit GAO.gov for a comprehensive list of the agency’s assets. While we rely on these free databases, we combine them with paid database subscriptions (we subscribe to Deltek GovWin) to get the best of both worlds. Free tracking databases to support capture and proposal System Award for Management (SAM) (SAM.gov): This website provides a one-stop shop for identifying and tracking bid and contract information. Sam.gov enables users to register their business with the Federal Government, track contracting opportunities, capture contractor performance information, view contract data, and search assistance listings. Dynamic Small Business Search (DSBS) (sba.gov/pro-net/search/dsp_dsbs.cfm): Helps you to find small business contractors for potential teaming on upcoming bids. Individual Agency Acquisition sites: Some agencies maintain … Continue reading Top 10 free government websites and databases for supporting your bid

Continue reading...

Lessons Learned in Strength-Based Winning® from GAO’s Protest Docket

The best sources to learn about how the government grades best value competitions

One of the best sources to learn about how the government grades best value competitions is the General Accountability Office (GAO) Protest Docket. The Docket explains the proposal requirements, how the government graded the proposal, and provides their justification for the score. The five cases presented below from GAO’s November Protest Docket provide lessons we can use to improve proposals. We deleted references to the solicitation name, protester, and winners(s) to focus on key messages from GAO’s findings. Agency: Defense Mission Agency (MDA) The Score: The protester’s proposal had 4 strengths, 2 weaknesses, 5 significant weaknesses, and 3 deficiencies. According to the government, the proposal did not demonstrate technical knowledge in multiple areas that are important to the MDA mission. The Issue: With 3 deficiencies the government stated that the proposal was “unawardable” due to the unacceptable rating under a key mission capability factor. The Source Selection Authority (SSA) found … Continue reading Lessons Learned in Strength-Based Winning® from GAO’s Protest Docket

Continue reading...

How to review your proposal to move beyond ‘Acceptable’

At a minimum, proposals must be compliant and responsive.

This article was originally published on May 1, 2020 on WashingtonTechnology.com We all know that, at a minimum, proposals must be compliant and responsive. If a proposal meets this minimum bar, the evaluator is likely to award it an Acceptable rating. But what if, despite several rounds of color team reviews, the proposal barely meets this mark? A Mediocre Proposal We can assume that an Acceptable proposal will not win in a federal government competitive best value trade-off, unless other bidders also submit Acceptable proposals, and price is the determining factor. Under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR), government evaluators must make an award based on benefits offered by the proposer. Those benefits may include features of the proposed offering with proven benefits, or a low price, or some combination of the two. Still, unless the win strategy is based on a low bid, the goal of our color team reviews … Continue reading How to review your proposal to move beyond ‘Acceptable’

Continue reading...

DHS FLASH 2.0: Should you invest in this procurement?

DHS announced last summer that they are considering issuing FLASH 2.0 in FY18

After the Department of Homeland Security cancelled the $1.5 billion Flexible Agile Support for the Homeland (FLASH) procurement May 26, the vendor community was irritated, and rightfully so. This Small Business (SB) set-aside, procured through the DHS Procurement Innovation Lab (PIL), required time, money, and expertise to undertake a technical challenge. Bidders had to demonstrate specialized skills in the incremental Agile software development methodology with rapid prototyping and better user interfaces. Numerous protests and a cancelled procurement After 111 companies applied for a spot on this IDIQ through a process that included limited written proposals, a three-minute initial video, and a four-hour live technology demonstration, DHS made 11 awards that were quickly the subject of 35 separate protests by 10 bidders. Protests centered around numerous mistakes made in the evaluation process. When DHS subsequently cancelled the procurement after six months, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) dismissed the protests. Industry outcry … Continue reading DHS FLASH 2.0: Should you invest in this procurement?

Continue reading...