Category Results for Tools & Tips

Opportunity at a glance: OASIS Plus Multi-Agency Contract

On September 15, 2022, the Office of Professional Services and Human Capital (PSHC) released the eighth in a series of program updates to keep industry abreast of the latest news on the development of OASIS Plus (OASIS+). OASIS+ is an opportunity to expand upon the original OASIS successes.                   Who should bid and why you should bid This is an easy decision. OASIS+ will be one of the U.S. Government’s largest and most valuable Best-in-Class (BIC) Indefinite-Delivery Indefinite-Quantity (IDIQ) contract vehicles for the next 10 years. It’s likely to award more than $133.75B in task orders. In addition, OASIS+ has swim lanes for 8(a), Small Businesses, Full and Open/Unrestricted, HUBZone, Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Businesses (SDVOSB), and Woman-Owned Small Businesses. Potential competition OASIS+ combines the One Acquisition Solution For Integrated Services Unrestricted (OASIS), Human Capital and Training Solutions (HCaTS), and Federal Strategic Sourcing … Continue reading Opportunity at a glance: OASIS Plus Multi-Agency Contract

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Alliant 3 – Opportunity at a glance

Ideas for a win strategy and preparing your proposal

GSA released a Draft Request for Proposal (DRFP) and questions template for Alliant 3 on October 19, 2022. On October 21, GSA released an Alliant 3 Modification with a new DRFP and the Document Verification and Self Scoring Worksheet. Alliant 3 Questions GSA requests that offerors review the documents and provide questions and comments by 12:00 pm ET on January 6, 2023. Who should bid and why you should bid Any company that can generate a high-scoring proposal should bid on Alliant 3, which is one of the most lucrative Governmentwide Acquisition Contracts (GWAC) Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contracts available. Potential competition Chief competitors include top-tier Alliant 2 contractors and new entities (Contractor Team Arrangements (CTAs), Joint Ventures (JVs), or other entities approved in the DRFP) that can produce high-scoring proposals. Ideas for a win strategy and preparing your proposal Read the DRFP instructions and the Document Verification and … Continue reading Alliant 3 – Opportunity at a glance

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Checklist for moving your proposal score from Green to Blue

Follow these steps to improve your score

Checklist for moving your proposal score from Green to Blue Step 1: Understand the scoring criteria Understand how the government is prioritizing the scores and what criteria carries more weight. Understand the meaning of the language that the government is using to score your proposal in terms of your understanding and approach and potential strengths, weaknesses, significant weaknesses, and deficiencies. Understand the granularity of the scoring scale and how might it impact your score. Step 2: Maximize your Strengths across all evaluated criteria Create a Strength budget to verify whether you have one more Strengths across every evaluated criteria and that these Strengths exceed the government’s requirements. Verify the customer values the Strengths you are bidding. Verify the Strengths support your value proposition and are not neutralized by another bidder. Step 3: Increase your Confidence Rating (if scored) Describe how your solution produces successful mission outcomes, while minimizing risk. Identify … Continue reading Checklist for moving your proposal score from Green to Blue

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Use of personal pronouns in government proposals

Always try to be respectful of the customer

During one of Lohfeld Consulting Group’s recent proposal writing classes, a student asked, “how should we use personal pronouns in government proposals?” I answered that I always tried to be respectful of the customer I was addressing and the person to whom I am referring in the proposal and use their pronouns of choice. However, in many cases you might not know their pronouns of choice, so consider using their title. I wasn’t satisfied with my immediate answer, so I decided to consult the government’s plainlanguage.gov website. Here’s what the website indicated: Avoid using “he” or “she” You can avoid awkwardness by using “you” to address the reader directly, rather than using “he or she” or “his or her.” Make sure you use pronouns that clearly refer to a specific noun. If a pronoun could refer to more than one person or object in a sentence, repeat the name of … Continue reading Use of personal pronouns in government proposals

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